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Speed Camera Law & Developments 2002

LEGAL HELPLINE: ☎ 0844 414 1982

Please note that we can only deal with a road accident injury claim
and we do not provide advice on speeding offences.

June 2002 Many of those cameras won't be scrapped after all! Now it appears that a camera can remain in place if it can't be proved that it is acting as a speed deterrent. Forces have been told that they could keep existing cameras even if they didn't meet the criteria.  If it can be proved that a camera is having a deterrent effect then it would be allowed to stay.

More Cameras to be installed. Many more police forces are to join the 'Safety Camera Partnership' in which a proportion of the revenue raised from fines must be ploughed back into reducing road casualties. Currently any police forces outside the partnership can hide their cameras behind signs or bushes and can leave them painted grey. This situation should change when all police forces join the partnership.  The biggest increase is likely to be in mobile  cameras which have to be clearly visible and operate from vans which are clearly marked.  Also, there will have to be warning signs before the camera location. 

August 2002 Danger Roads Have Fewest Cameras. A survey has claimed that there are almost a third more speed cameras on safe roads than on the most dangerous.  The study has revealed that 18 cameras monitor more than 500 miles of the most hazardous roads compared to 24 on the 50 safest stretches.  The report was compiled for Autocar magazine.

Study suggests that Speed Cameras cause more Accidents. A study by Transport Planning Consultant David Keenan has suggested that some cameras actually increase the chances of crashes.  Drivers approaching them brake suddenly risking being hit by the car behind, then race away even faster than before.  
He found that in sites which used the traditional one-flash Gatso cameras the number of accidents rose.  Modern specs devices, which measure the average speed of a vehicle between points, are much more effective at reducing both speed and the incidence of a road accident injury claim occurring on a particular stretch of road.  But they are far more expensive to buy and install, meaning that Gatso cameras are still used at the vast majority of sites.
The survey lists sites where accidents have increased significantly where Gatso cameras are used but reports that at a site where the new-style specs camera was present accidents reduced from 33 in the year up to installation in July 2000, to 22 in the 12 months after.
The Department of Transport insisted that its own research has shown a reduction of 47 per cent in the number killed and seriously injured at sites where cameras are installed.

LEGAL HELPLINE: ☎ 0844 414 1982

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