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Speed Camera Law & Development 1973-2001

LEGAL HELPLINE: ☎ 0844 414 1982

Please note that we only deal with personal injury compensation
claims and we do not provide advice on speeding offences.

1973 Radar Gun.- VASCAR (Visual Average Speed Computer and Recorder) is used for the first time by Essex & Southend Constabulary.
1992 Fixed Cameras Installed. Speed enforcement cameras introduced at permanent sites.
December 1998 Police may be allowed to keep fines.  The move would allow forces throughout Britain to turn the controversial cameras into a real deterrent to reduce offences and the incidence of car accident injury claim legal action. The cameras raise £17m a year in fines but it goes straight to the Treasury.  Police have complained that they cannot afford to keep all their cameras supplied with film and prosecute all of the thousands of motorists caught.
The Government has said it will 'look favourably' on any schemes to let camera operators keep more of their fines, but there will be 'strict safeguards' to ensure the cameras are not used simply to raise money. The AA said it would not oppose the idea providing that the cash is not used as a financial incentive to install more cameras. The RAC said it was disturbed and unhappy. It believed that cameras should be there to save lives and not to make money for the police and councils.
A spokesman for  The Association of Chief Police Officers said 'it could cut the death toll on the roads - we will have more sites, more cameras, and they will be used more. The chances of getting caught will rise significantly.  
July 2000 33 MPH and You Could Be Nicked. New guidance from the Association of Chief Police Officers means that drivers exceeding the 30 mph speed limit by just 3 mph could face prosecution. Patrol officers will be able to use their discretion. For example a driver doing 33 mph outside a school when there are children and parents about could face a summons, but when doing 38mph on the same road late in the evening may escape with a fixed penalty. It is hoped that this zero tolerance policy will reduce car accident injury claim legal action.
May 2001 Helicopter Surveillance. Police in Derbyshire announce that they will use their helicopter to spot bad driving and speeding on a stretch of the A6 between Belper and Buxton where numerous accidents have occurred in the last three years, many of them being motorcycle riders. The helicopter itself will not carry speed detection equipment, but officers will pass on details of the offender to patrol cars on the ground.

LEGAL HELPLINE: ☎ 0844 414 1982

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